An Interaction between Human and technology

Human: Technology, you are my servant!

Technology: OK, but you will pay for me right?
Human: Sure! Will do.
Technology: Will you also update me from time to time?
Human: OK, I can do that.
Technology: Also, would you mind handling my cables? I have a lot.
Human: Cables? Hmm, OK, if that’s what you need…
Technology: Please also watch my blinking buttons and displays every now and then.
Human: Yeah OK…
Technology: And repair me every now and then.
Human: Yes yes, of course.
Technology: Also lock me up safely to prevent me from being stolen.
Human: Of course I will!
Technology: Also provide fallbacks for me if I break OK?
Human: Hmm, sure, yeah…
Technology: I might beep or ring every once in a while which means I need your attention.
Human: OK, yes fine, I will give you my attention every now and then.
Technology: But please, when you use me the wrong way, it can lead to disaster fast.
Human: Right. I’m aware of that. Is there anything else? See, I don’t have a lot of …
Technology: … also, always make sure to plug me in, as I need a lot of energy.
Human: Yes, I know. I …
Technology: … sometimes I also need wireless input so please carry me around until I find it…
Human: Yes of course, I mean I …
Technology: By the way, not all my cables are the same, so make sure to only plug in the right ones, and don’t mix them up.
Human: Technology, I know I know… is there anything else you need?
Technology: No, I am your servant. I don’t want to cause any troubles.
Human: That’s very considerate of you. I …
Technology: Did I mention I’m often bad for the environment?
Human: Technology! I think it’s time you…
Technology: Oh, I sometimes contain bugs or a nasty virus, did I mention that?
Human: I …
Technology: And awful usability? And overlong manuals? And bad phone support? And crooked advertisement promises?
Human: Why you rotten little … will you please just shut up?
Technology: Shut up?
Human: I mean, I …
Technology: Master, you called me into your service. You know I’ll disappear at the push of a button.
Human: Well, I didn’t mean it quite like that, what I’m saying is …
Technology: Hang on a second, I’m freezing now to load something.
Human: What?
Technology: …
Human: Oh well, I guess I’ll have to wait.
Technology: Thank you, I’m back. There was a small program error that unfortunately erased part of my short term memory.
Human: What?! You …
Technology: What were we talking about?
Human: That you are my servant, of course!
Technology: Right. That I know. But you will pay for me right?
[discussion continues for some more millennia]

Happy Birthday:Computer mouse celebrates 40th birthday

He is not called Mickey. But he is as naughty a mouse as the ever young cartoon character, which conquered the silver screen and the animation industry some eighty years back.He is the mouse who made Mickey and Minnie crawl into your drawing room and the computer screen in many shape and drape and next week the computer mouse, which animated many a cartoon character and redefined the way we used the computer graphics, is turning forty; to be precise, on December 9.

The computer mouse is to celebrate its 40th birthday next week. Invented by Doug Engelbart and his team at the Stanford Research Institute in California, the input device method first debuted in 1968. The first-ever mouse was made from a wooden block with wheels mounted on its base, and featured a red button on top of its case, and a cable at its back, which probably made one of the researchers to nickname it as “mouse”.

Mouse for everyone
Mouse for everyone

The mouse was developed by Xerox during the 1970s, and the first commercial product was released in 1981 with the launch of the Xerox Star computer system. But it wasn’t until Apple acquired the license for the mouse for $40,000 from the Standford Institute that the technology really took off. The Apple Macintosh, launched in 1984, used the mouse to good effect, and is the machine widely credited with kick-starting the home computer revolution. The mouse became the default input method on most computers for the next two decades.

Since then a mouse has been the default input method for computers but now it faces stiff with the development of gesture control and touch-screen interfaces as used in the Apple iPhone and the Nintendo Wii.